Topic: Thoughts on Sliders in Random

A thread for random thoughts about mini-hamburgers and SLIDERS that don't need their own thread! I like White Castle.

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This is a thread for random SLIDERS-related thoughts (as opposed to random thoughts on other shows or personal status updates).

I was reviewing my upscale of "The Guardian," specifically the scenes where Quinn tells Quinn-2 to make his punches out and not to swing wildly. I found myself wondering: what did Michael Mallory lie to Quinn about exactly?

Also, when did Quinn learn to box? Did he always know how to fight? Or did he learn in the course of his sliding adventures?

Certainly, he was a sportsman as evidenced by the athletic gear in his bedroom, but in the first season of SLIDERS, his action moments have a flailing uncertainty and awkwardness. Is it that he boxed athletically but had never used it in an actual fight? In Season 2's "El Sid," Quinn demonstrates further physical awkwardness, bested by Sid at every turn -- but by "Greatfellas" and "As Time Goes By," Quinn has a firm, resolute confidence.

And young Quinn's dialogue in "The Guardian": he says that he asked his father to help him with his bullies at school. "He wouldn't help me! I asked him to come to school with me and get them off my back! He wouldn't! He said I had to deal with it. He said he'd help me. He didn't. He lied! I screamed at him! My dad died thinking I hated him."

Wait, what? Quinn told his father that the older boys at school were bullying him -- and his father refused go to school with him and told him to handle it, that he'd help him -- and then didn't.

This suggests that Michael Mallory promised to help and ignored him, except young Quinn's words are incoherent, first saying Michael refused to help, then saying Michael agreed to help but didn't follow up. I mean, Michael either said he'd help or didn't say he'd help, and if he didn't help, why did he lie about it?

Since the adult Quinn doesn't seem too bitter over his father, the only rationalization that comes to mind is that whatever help Michael provided was, in young Quinn's view, insufficient.

The confusion might be that there's an implication that young Quinn's been attacked before, but the actual scenes show that the physical assaults were after Michael's death, not before, so Michael wasn't abandoning his son to being punched in the face as much as allowing his son to be insulted and mocked.

There is a point you hit when you become an adult where you ideally become immune to such remarks. When I turned 28, it dawned on me finally that the only opinions I need to worry about are the opinions held by people who have control over or impact on my employment and income (and I always encourage everyone to be so great at their jobs that they are unfirable and impossible to lay off).

I've pointed this out to my niece whenever she worries about what people think when those people don't evaluate her job or academic performance and don't control her residence or finances. The lesson has not been absorbed, it has not taken hold, it may not take hold until between the ages of 27 - 34 if at all. Is that what the help Michael offered? Did Quinn find that help inadequate? Is that why he called Michael a liar who didn't help him?

Re: Thoughts on Sliders in Random

You stop worrying what other people think about you when you realize how seldom they actually do.

My impression is that Michael Mallory said he would help, then died before he could.  Young Quinn feels abandoned by his suddenly missing father.  The bullies sense his weakness and scale up the abuse accordingly, as the Code of TV Bullies requires.

Re: Thoughts on Sliders in Random

Quinn says he yelled at his father for not helping him and it was the last thing he ever said to his dad. Whatever Michael Mallory did or didn’t do that made Quinn angry was before his death.

Re: Thoughts on Sliders in Random

He's a kid.  Kids yell at their parents over nonsense all the time.

Re: Thoughts on Sliders in Random

On SLIDERS and masculinity:

When I decided to start my upscaling endeavour for SLIDERS, I started with "As Time Goes By." It's my favourite episode. It's highly imperfect (but what TV isn't?). Wade gets nothing to do and Daelin is a cipher on paper. But I watched this episode at age 11 and I saw in Quinn Mallory everything that a man could be and should be.

The fight with Dennis-2 stands out most: Quinn pretends to be retreating from a physical confrontation, then punches him in the face. Most Hollywood action heroes would find this cowardly, but Quinn will use whatever measures he has to protect the vulnerable and he doesn't care if that makes him look like less of a man which paradoxically is exactly what a man should be.

Then there's Quinn's tenderness with Daelin-1 earlier. Quinn has feelings for her. She is engaged to be married. But Quinn still wants to help her and sees that he needs her help to save Wade, Rembrandt and Arturo. Professor Arturo remarks at one point of a missing Quinn, "The boy is as slippery as an eel. He is undoubtedly in the lap of luxury as we speak," and at 11, I longed for my mother and father to think as well of me.

Quinn's regard for women is also educational. He regards Daelin with gentleness, not demanding anything of her and not threatened by her obligations to her fiance and later Daelin-2's daughter. He accepts both with grace and doesn't let that stop him from being a friend and an ally; he cares about her. Most interestingly, Daelin is Quinn's dream girl. What does Quinn Mallory want from a potential romantic partner?

Daelin is not a scientist or a genius like Logan; she is not a glamourous figure like June from "Greatfellas" or Kyra in "Slither," she is not a male gaze designed figure like Maggie. She's not even a good dresser, wearing the same flannel and jeans as Quinn and it looks like that's actually Jerry O'Connell's costume.

Daelin is a working class, blue collar labourer who has a tendency to "bring home strays" whether it's animals or injured men. She is a grounded, normal person who works hard to support her family. Quinn's ideal partner is just a nice, normal person defined by Brooke Langton infusing the character with an open gentleness and a quiet resolve to do her jobs and choke down grief and resentment to earn a living.

But more importantly for "As Time Goes By," Quinn is flawed. Quinn's fixation on Daelin causes him to tamper with cause and effect recklessly and desperately. Quinn almost dooms an entire dimension. Quinn's massive intellect means his solutions are brilliant, but his mistakes are corrrespondingly larger as well. A man should be capable. A man should be smart. And a man should be able to make mistakes, to acknowledge them, to face them and then learn from them.

It disappoints me to watch this episode and know that I have failed to live up to what this hour of TV presented to me when I was 11. In college, I wouldn't admit to mistakes and was needy and insecure with women. In grad school, I wouldn't learn from my errors. It took some serious blows to my ego after my graduate degree to finally take me back to where "As Time Goes By" had brought me in the first place.

Re: Thoughts on Sliders in Random

Rewatching "The King is Back" and... it's so odd that Clinton Derricks Carroll is obviously not identical to Cleavant. Some fans have noted that there was no strict rule that doubles were all identical and surely genetic variations and fitness and health would alter appearances. But this explanation doesn't hold true in the episode: Sabrina Lloyd has clearly been directed to play Wade as though she's astonished by how Rembrandt-2 looks just like Rembrandt; she stares at his face searching for differences -- almost as though she expected Clinton's position in the shot to be obscured by inserts of Cleavant in editing and performed accordingly.

The script is written to present both Rembrandts as identical and indistinguishable. I can only think that Torme either wasn't on set when his script was filmed and that by the time production had filmed the scenes with Clinton playing Rembrandt-2 without filming Cleavant playing the same scenes, it was too late to fix it.

In Season 2's "Greatfellas," all of Rembrandt-2's scenes are filmed twice, once with Clinton and once with Cleavant, both alternating the roles, both standing at careful angles so that their physical discrepancies don't stand out, and with the shots intermixed with Cleavant always playing Rembrandt or Rembrandt-2 when in full profile.

Re: Thoughts on Sliders in Random

SLIDERS had so much to teach. Why didn't I learn it?

There's a moment in "The King is Back" where Rembrandt is upset that Rembrandt-2 upstaged him. Arturo points out that Rembrandt-2 "did all the work" to earn his fame and fortune which is his by right. There's also the fact that Rembrandt is shown to be a skillful but solemn stage performer. In contrast, Rembrandt-2 is joyful, hyperenthused and has the energy to win over a crowd that our Rembrandt has either lost or never had because he never put in "the work." SLIDERS is so full of positive life lessons.

And yet, despite having viewed them and appreciated them as a young boy from age 10 onwards, it is clear to me that my life until age 29 did not reflect these lessons. I have had to ask myself why.

In my teens and twenties, when facing upset people, I would escalate instead of de-escalating -- despite the fact that "The Guardian" offers a clear instruction manual of how to do the latter.

QUINN-2: "He wouldn't help me! I asked him to come to school with me and get them off my back! He wouldn't! He said I had to deal with it. He said he'd help me. He didn't. He lied!"

The boy collapses to the floor in grief. The adult Quinn kneels to face his younger double, a kind hand held out but stopped at a distance from young Quinn, giving him space and control.

QUINN-2: "I screamed at him! I told him I hated him. My dad died thinking I hated him."

QUINN: "No. He knew how much you loved him.”

Quinn puts his hand on the boy's shoulder. His voice is calm and resolute. His presence is an anchor of stability and certainty.

QUINN: "And he loved you with all his heart. Now, what happened to your father was an accident. It wasn't your mother's fault. And it wasn't yours. Deep down, you might even blame him for leaving you. And that's what hurts most of all -- so you've got to fight those feelings."

My conclusion is that the direction of SLIDERS after "The Guardian" spiraled so badly that it obliterated what the series had to offer me in my formative years. Instead of appreciating Wade's practicality in "The Weaker Sex" when she thinks to buy groceries for her friends after getting hired, I thought of her severed head in a fishtank.

Instead of noting Arturo's respect for Rembrandt-2's hard work in "The King is Back," I recalled Arturo's mumbled final words. Instead of thinking of Quinn's decency and calm, I remembered Jerry O'Connell's sneering, smirking half-assery throughout Seasons 3 - 4.

And instead of learning from Rembrandt's warmth and charm, I thought of how horrific it must have been to be kidnapped into the interdimension and to lose everyone and everything.

The values SLIDERS originally offered -- of literacy, knowledge, teamwork, friendship, humour and inventive improvisation to triumph over all odds -- that wasn't how I remembered SLIDERS. Instead, the way I remembered the show is, oddly, captured in Annie Fish's review of "The Dying Fields" as they wrote their summary of Quinn's reaction to his new Humagg friend being knifed to death.

Annie Fish wrote:

The sliders do, in fact, succeed. They open Kyra’s eyes and show her that it’s more important and worthwhile to pay attention to her Human side. Which is when Kryoptus stabs Kyra in the gut, killing her almost instantly. Quinn watches, emotionless, as all they tried to do slips away with her lifeblood. Then he slides. The show doesn’t even hang on the moment.

You can see the finality on Quinn’s face— change is worthless. It doesn’t exist. Life is cruel, and unusual, and completely unfair. So why bother? Why bother feeling? Why bother trying— why bother with anything?

You shouldn’t. And this is what SLIDERS is really about. It’s the personification of cynicism. Of nihilism. Of existential horror taken to such a complete extreme as to become completely meaningless.

Or, it’s nothing more than yet another inane episode of a shitty television show no one watches anymore.
https://earthprime.com/roulette/i-feel- … ing-fields

And that's what I took out of the show with each cast member leaving, with each asinine turn of plot, with each running arc abandoned. I think that's how I went into the world and even though I didn't truly subscribe to that, I carried it with me until about 2015.

When writing SLIDERS REBORN in 2015, poor Transmodiar had to go through my outlines and asked me with some bleakness why my supposedly 'back to basics' approach was cluttered with facing down Season 3 - 5 story elements, why it was so important for the sliders to use MACGYVER style tactics to fight Season 3 monsters. "What are you trying to accomplish?" he asked me, and I eventually settled on SLIDERS REBORN as the equivalent of a fan-oriented media tie (like the X-FILES comics of 2013 and the William Shatner STAR TREK novels).

Slider_Quinn21, in reviewing the material, seized upon another questionable area: SLIDERS REBORN declares that in 2001, Quinn reset reality to remove the Kromaggs and sliding from history, recreating an unharmed home Earth to which he could return Wade, Rembrandt and Arturo. However, this damaged the multiverse, limiting all branching points to the first day of sliding in 1994/1995, which means every Earth in this curtailed multiverse has the same environmental damage and will soon be unable to support human life.

Transmodiar and Slider_Quinn21 both did not buy this, saying that the Earth wasn't doomed in 1994 - 1995. I don't... entirely buy it myself. Yet, I insisted on it, and I think I now see why: me saying that the multiverse is innately and fundamentally damaged by the events of Seasons 3 - 5 and the offscreen Season 6 -- that  is actually me saying that I have been innately and fundamentally damaged by those same events.

The multiverse of SLIDERS REBORN -- like my mind -- has been traumatized by the death of Professor Arturo, the sexual assault of Wade Welles, the disappearance of Quinn Mallory, and the unbearable burdens left for Rembrandt Brown to shoulder.

Interestingly, the cancellation of SLIDERS is not presented in SLIDERS REBORN as another mentally/cosmically cataclysmic event, but as a moment of freedom and opportunity for Quinn, Wade, Rembrandt and Arturo to regain control of the narrative and start repairing the damage.

Transmodiar described me as having "mainlined the insanity of Seasons 3 - 5" and says that I "went into a fugue writing state of epic proportions and committed to the insanity" and he couldn't understand why. "What are you trying to accomplish?"

To offer a long-delayed but finally accurate answer: it's become clear that SLIDERS REBORN is unknowingly but ultimately a story about confronting trauma, first by restoring the original sliders and their core values, then having them face down each specific instance of trauma on my behalf.

I don't believe you can erase trauma; you learn to live with it and transmute it. This is probably why, after re-establishing Quinn, Wade, Rembrandt and Arturo as THE sliders, Maggie Beckett rejoins the team. It's why Mallory is presented in Quinn's dreamscape as a friend. It's why Diana Davis is hired by Sliders Incorporated. And it's why they ultimately have to fight the Season 3 monsters whose reappearances terrify Rembrandt into a frightened paralysis until Arturo slaps him and Rembrandt snaps out of it.

It's also why the sliders don't kill any of the Season 3 monsters and simply immobilize them.

And this is probably why it was only in 2015 when SLIDERS REBORN went live on EarthPrime.com that I finally started functioning the way a young man should after absorbing Seasons 1 - 2 of SLIDERS.

Re: Thoughts on Sliders in Random

"Obsession" offers a pretty clear guide for men on consent and respect for boundaries with women. Derek Bond claims to love Wade, but his approach is to invade her privacy without asking first. He isolates her from her friends. "She had to kill herself to get away from you," Quinn snarls at Derek as he cradles Wade's supposedly-dead but sedated body, "and you call that love!?"

And yet, I somehow lost this lesson and only got it back at the end of my twenties. I didn't understand how that happened, but now, I know why: it's because SLIDERS undermined its own respect for women by introducing Kari Wuhrer as Maggie Beckett, an actress shaped by men for the male gaze playing a character designed for the edification of men. Maggie is designed as something that a man would like to own rather than a person in her own right. SLIDERS further presents women as objects to be used and mutilated through Wade being sent to an offscreen rape camp and then being mutilated into a severed head in a computer.

As a result, I forgot about "Obsession," I forgot what it had to offer in how to respect the privacy and boundaries of women. I didn't believe in what the latter episodes professed, but I also had trouble rejecting what they had to say as untrue or wrong because those were the terms on which the show continued and concluded.

I got it back, mostly by giving a 42 year old Quinn in SLIDERS REBORN a teenaged daughter and forcing myself to study Wade Welles until I finally understood her as a figure of spiritual beliefs but also relentless practicality. And I know I got it back because most of my friendships today are platonic friendships with women. But it really speaks to how I felt for a very long time that SLIDERS was something that was ripped out of my life and left a hole in me where there should have been morality and consideration for the autonomy of others.

I sometimes think I would be such a different person if Torme had stayed on SLIDERS, if it had stayed in Vancouver -- but the truth is I'd probably be who I am now, I'd have just gotten here earlier.

Re: Thoughts on Sliders in Random

I believe in SLIDERS. I believe in the values that Seasons 1 - 2 espouse and uphold -- and interestingly, some of what's professed in the Pilot and "Prince of Wails" are hurriedly questioned later in the season. The Pilot and "Prince of Wails" both imply that 1994 America is a utopia and any alternate path of history is a deviation to be corrected, something "The Weaker Sex," "Eggheads" and "Luck of the Draw" are quick to counter. However, stepping back from the social commentary, the Pilot has some very meaningful things to say about fear and failure. Rembrandt is terrified. By any conventional standard, Rembrandt Brown is in a horror movie: he is kidnapped and seemingly abandoned in a fascist dystopia. He's terrified and alone. Helpless and afraid.

Cleavant Derricks plays it all for laughs. There's something truly brilliant about how Derricks takes what is traumatic and transmutes it into comedy, shrieking at Quinn that Quinn will have to explain to the insurance company why Rembrandt's car is in snowbank in a parallel Earth. "They're never going to buy that when I put in my claim!" Derricks exclaims with grief and outrage that never fails to make me smile. When the horrific is made humourous, it can be confronted, addressed and resolved. And Cleavant quickly adds depth to the character, gently singing Amazing Grace over the bodies of those who gave their lives to save him and so many others, putting love and respect and gratitude into every note, setting aside the egotism and insecurity he had to honour others.

There's also something special about how Commander Wade Welles dies -- a loss that the Revolution declared would mean the end of their movement -- only for the sliders to discover that the Revolution is willing to carry on. Annie Fish snarked about this mercilessly, declaring that the rebels didn't learn anything from this episode aside from the certainty that they could probably blow up a guard tower now and then; Fish joked that the rebels probably all died within a week of the sliders' departure. Fish has been marred and damaged by the later seasons presenting SLIDERS as the "personification of cynicism. Of nihilism. Of existential horror taken to such a complete extreme as to become completely meaningless."

Fish is mistaken. In the original draft of the Pilot, Commander Wade Welles lived. But in her death, we see that a revolution is not a single person. A revolution is an idea, a belief that things can be different if people put in the work and strain and strive to make it happen, a vision that the sliders in their visit made plausible and real. The rebels failed to save their Wade, but failure is something every single person and movement will experience. Every person alive has felt as scared as Rembrandt over something and has lost as badly as the rebels -- it's in these moments that SLIDERS suggests we can find our most resolute and gracious selves.

This belief is undermined in "Genesis" when the sliders abandon their home Earth to an invasion -- yet, even this "cynicism" and "nihilism" that Fish observes is actually undermined immediately and instantly in the following episode when the sliders easily topple the fascist dictatorship of "Prophets and Loss" within 44 minutes of screentime, a spark of the original SLIDERS showing through the wreckage.

I lost this part of SLIDERS for a long time during that period where I felt severed from the show and unable to replace it and haunted by the fallout of "Genesis." When I failed to get a job offer, I would feel depressed and stop applying. When I got stuck writing a story, I would stop writing. When a friendship failed, I would stop trying to find new ones. I lost the ability to move forward from failure even though the Pilot offered a clear and simple example of how to do exactly that. I lost my way.

And I think this is why, in SLIDERS REBORN, Quinn in 2015 reveals that the multiverse is damaged, has been for 14 years, and Quinn hasn't been able to fix it. Like me, Quinn was hurt and damaged by his defeats and deeply depressed over everything from 2000 - 2015. Unlike me, Quinn Mallory doesn't quit. He keeps trying, he keeps failing, he fails repeatedly until he finally stumbles across something that works. This is the path of any revolution that succeeds.

There's a scene in the last REBORN script where the Season 3 monsters descend upon San Francisco. Rembrandt emits a high pitched squeal of fright and points a shaking finger at the zombie hordes and freezes. The Professor slaps him. Rembrandt snaps out of it and gets to work saving people. Slider_Quinn21 worked with me on this scene, elaborating on how to describe Cleavant's comical facial expressions from Season 1, the "Rembrandt face," as Slider_Quinn21 put it.

Rembrandt panicked and paralyzed at the sight of otherworldy monsters only to shift into his seen-it-all persona from Season 5 is, I hope, Rembrandt's arc in a nutshell -- and an effort to recover what was lost.

Re: Thoughts on Sliders in Random

Should anyone ever depend on an American television show for moral instruction? I don't know. It could be argued that I should have found something else. Every lesson learned from SLIDERS up to age 11 was a lesson lost by age 14 with Seasons 3 - 5.

My parents and I were not on civil speaking terms in my childhood, I had to work with what I had at age 10 and what I had to hand was SLIDERS.

In "Gillian of the Spirits," a double of Quinn Mallory's revered and beloved father, Michael, is revealed to be something else. He is an antagonist, a man who has been forced to act on behalf of greedy, manipulative figures who have armed him with a gun and directed him against innocent people, fueling him with desperation and self-preservation.

In the face of Michael's betrayal, Professor Arturo triggers the vortex and invites Michael to join the sliders. "A man shouldn't live unappreciated in his world," says the Professor, himself an unappreciated genius. The Professor empathizes with the man holding a gun to his chest, offering him a chance.

Quinn appears and appeals to his father's decency and better nature, urging him to lower his weapon. And before leaving, Quinn forgives his father, telling Gillian to pass on the message that Michael Mallory's son will always love him.

SLIDERS declares that it is a capital mistake to put anyone on a pedestal, an error to think that Michael Mallory in this world or any other would be a perfect and flawless specimen of humanity. Quinn himself notes in "Luck of the Draw": "You don't get something for NOTHING." That's not cynicism; that's understanding that people act in their own best interests for their own gains -- and to think otherwise is foolish.

"Gillian of the Spirits" doesn't declare that everyone is innately self-serving or inherently kind. It simply states that people have the capacity for good or evil. Malevolence is never beyond anyone; the Bayside Power bureaucrats are evil and manipulative. But redemption is never unattainable; it is within reach in every moment of choice such as when Michael is moved by the sight of his dead son and lowering his weapon. In addition, rather than try to have Michael act against his own goals, Arturo suggests that they can have mutual goals if Michael joins the sliders.

I understood this after watching "Gillian of the Spirits" at age 11 -- but then my grasp of human nature got shakier and shakier with each episode of Seasons 3 - 5. Season 4 declared Quinn was a hero even as he became callous and indifferent to the suffering of others, abandoned Wade in "Mother and Child," and then abandoned his home Earth and Rembrandt in "Revelations." Villains were villainous for the sake of being so. The rock star vampires in "Stoker," the Season 4 Kromaggs, the evil doctor in "Map of the Mind" -- they were antagonists and therefore evil despite lacking motives or meaningful gains.

I tried to distance myself from the show as this happened, but it's clear that it affected me. In my late teens and twenties, I lost my confidence in human nature; I became convinced that anyone and everyone would always exploit any vulnerability or opportunity to harm others.

Every person who hurt my feelings through any slights large or small was David Peckinpah -- a deranged, malevolent force turning my life into a horror movie for reasons unknowable and unfathomable. They were Colonel Rickman, a diseased slasher killer wandering into my life. They were the Season 4 Kromagg space Nazis, incompetent fascist poseurs. They were the arcade manager from "A Thousand Deaths."

This is undoubtedly the cause of my numerous social difficulties in my twenties.

When David Peckinpah overdosed and his heart gave out from drug abuse, SLIDERS fans rejoiced. I was largely silent, but one of Peckinpah's sons posted on the IMDB forums, describing his father's two decades of sobriety -- until 1994 when Peckinpah's 16 year old son Garrett died suddenly from meningitis. In his grief, Peckinpah fell back into his addiction, lost the ability to run a TV show, and it killed him in the end.

It was strange: Temporal Flux had told me about this painful chapter in Peckinpah's history, but it never truly registered until years later, when I was rewatching "Murder Most Foul," a splendid episode that demonstrates Peckinpah's clear talent as a writer and producer as well as his joyful obsession with historical re-enactment -- gifts that he unfortunately didn't bring to any episode of SLIDERS that he didn't write himself.

At the end of "Murder Most Foul," Quinn invites a little boy, Trevor, to join the sliders, but cautions that there is no way to bring Trevor home. Trevor declines, deciding to enjoy his childhood fully, but promises to someday build his own sliding machine and find the sliders.

An autobiography can lie. But fiction can't; what a writer creates reveals himself fully whether he wants it to or not. Trevor was named after one of Peckinpah's children, and it's obvious that Trevor's promise to find the sliders again someday voices Peckinpah's own longing to be reunited with the son he lost.

Transmodiar could not understand why SLIDERS REBORN insisted on bringing in the Season 3 monsters for the final script when I have never expressed anything but disdain for the Season 3 monsters. When I told him that "Regenesis" would be "warmly dedicated to David Ernest Peckinpah, screenwriter, director, producer and loving father, husband and family man," Transmodiar crowed, "As well it should! Because it celebrates all the wrong he brought to the show!"

But... I felt that Slider_Quinn21 understood it. Or at least acted like he did out of empathy and gentleness. Slider_Quinn21 worked with me so that the sequences of Wade, Rembrandt and Arturo fighting the dragon with aspirin and the dinosaur with hash butter and the underground predators with UV lights and the vampires with garlic puree were funny.

Slider_Quinn21 refined some of Rembrandt's quips and made sure that the sliders paid for all the items they took from the Doppler Superstore. Slider_Quinn21 also observed that the monster fighting sequences were far more interesting than Quinn and Quinn-2 firing sand and water through vortexes at each other, and he was very supportive of the conclusion of "Regenesis" where Quinn and Quinn-2 set aside their differences and work together.

At the time, I wanted the visual of the Season 1 - 2 team facing the Season 3 horrors with humour and levity -- but I see now that it was an effort to go back to "Gillian of the Spirits." People aren't against you; they are for themselves, but tragedy can sometimes make them think that poisoning themselves to numb their pain is their best route when it's not.

As Slider_Quinn21 would have to remind me in the course of my writing: people are not simply good or evil; they are capable of either and their ideas in themselves -- like doing horror movies with SLIDERS -- are not inherently good or bad until put into practice either with wit, charm, love and passion or grief, misery, indifference and contempt.

It's interesting that after "Murder Most Foul," David Peckinpah withdraws into monster movies rather than engaging in his gift for writing stories about older people interacting with younger people like Quinn and Trevor -- which is a talent Peckinpah shared with Tracy Torme given the excellence of "The Guardian." The age difference with Quinn and Wade being younger than Rembrandt and Arturo would have been perfect for Peckinpah's talents.

But never again would Peckinpah put his feelings about his children and his son into his writing; "Murder Most Foul" clearly struck too close to home; I wouldn't be surprised if "Trevor" had originally been "Garrett" only for Peckinpah to pull back. He didn't want to reveal his agony further; he withdrew from it; he tried to cauterize it with amphetamines and opiates. He fell into what a life of Annie Fish calls "cynicism. Of nihilism. Of existential horror taken to such a complete extreme as to become completely meaningless."

And I think that's why I unconsciously wrote SLIDERS REBORN's final script the way I did; to finish what Peckinpah started in "Murder Most Foul" but chose not to finish. "Regenesis" reveals that Dennis MacMillan didn't "drop out of graduate school to join a band"; he was caught stealing from a pharmacy which he did to try to settle his father's gambling debts, he failed and his father was killed.

"Regenesis" reunites Dennis with his restored father in the rebuilt multiverse and Quinn makes it happen, Quinn himself longing to be reunited with Michael Mallory. This is clearly an unintended yet obvious echo of "Murder Most Foul." At one point, Quinn asks his 15 year old daughter Laurel to trust him and Laurel snaps, "Trust you? I barely know you!" pointing out that they only learned of each other's existence 18 months previous and that they won't know if Quinn has what it takes to be a dad until Laurel is in her 30s -- another obvious reference to Peckinpah's misery over losing the time he should have had with Garrett.

These are the stories that Peckinpah should have written for SLIDERS. Not monster movies, not space invasions -- he should have written stories about sliding providing the opportunity to revisit tragedy and loss, not necessarily to erase them, but to address and recover from them. I see now that I wished to write the stories he should have for himself.

Because if you can forgive David Peckinpah for SLIDERS, you might be able to forgive anyone for anything and you might even be able to forgive yourself.

Re: Thoughts on Sliders in Random

Temporal Flux shared a guide to writing SLIDERS stories awhile ago.
http://sliders.tv/bboard/viewtopic.php?pid=10285#p10285

I've engaged with it and studied it and thought hard on it -- and I've come to the conclusion that I can't do it. It's just not how I think. I don't think of ideas the way Temporal Flux does. When I think of SLIDERS, I think of *the* sliders. Recently, someone asked me for help with some SLIDERS writing and my main advice was: have something to say about the sliders or SLIDERS that has never been said before. Don't just reiterate what we already know. Reveal something about SLIDERS. I don't mean reveal that Professor Arturo killed Michael Mallory in a hit and run. I mean reveal an insight or an idea about SLIDERS.

I think that Professor Arturo was well on his way to becoming a villain; that he was jealous, bitter, angry and dis-spirited and was probably going to steal his students' research to present it as his own or go work for a foreign power to build nuclear weapons or do something horrific to satisfy his own ego or he was going to start coming into work drunk and get in a car accident while under the influence -- but sliding saved him. It forced him to be the leader and father figure to a wayward adult man and two college kids, it demanded that he get his act together and drew out the best in him.

I think Rembrandt is suffering from severe trauma, anxiety and post traumatic stress disorder -- none of which manifests outwardly because he is so ridiculously fond of Quinn, Wade and Arturo that all these psychological issues just get frozen in his psyche -- but all of which will emerge and manifest when Quinn, Wade and Arturo aren't around. I have no idea how it didn't happen in Seasons 3 - 5, and I cannot explain it except to say I consider Seasons 3 - 5 a corrupted timeline.

I think that Quinn knew all along that Wade was crushing on him and for Reasons (repression, self-loathing, wanting to keep his sliding research secret, a sense of being unable to relate to people after Daelin) -- Quinn pretended to be unaware. I think that without sliding, Wade would have come to view as Quinn being cruelly indifferent to her feelings and would have come to despise him -- and that without sliding, Quinn and Wade wouldn't even be friends anymore. I also think that "Last Days" making Wade realize Quinn was aware of her crush all along had an effect -- one where she was so troubled by his avoidance and withdrawal that she herself took a step back to figure out who this athletic nerd really is.

I think that Wade is bisexual and that Diana Davis is gay. There is no onscreen evidence for the former, some indication for the latter.

I think that Kromaggs are not actually individuals. I believe that Kromaggs are actually a single hive mind spread out across multiple clone bodies and that the entire Dynasty is just one individual mapped to multiple forms. I also believe that the Season 4 Kromaggs are an alternate version from a corrupted timeline or a corrupted memory experienced by Quinn in a dream state.

I think that Quinn, Wade, Rembrandt and Arturo have been alive and well since 2000 and made it home by 2001 after erasing the Kromaggs from existence.

I think that in 2015, Quinn Mallory met Peter Parker from the 616 Marvel Comics Universe and that they have a monthly podcast where they discuss dealing with all the weird things they've both encountered (clones, dragons, alien invasions, dinosaur attacks, breeder parasites, killer robots, giant slugs, becoming unstuck in time, becoming merged with another person as a secondary consciousness, getting married in a parallel timeline that was erased, fighting giant beetles, fighting twisters, befriending living intelligent flames, becoming a zombie... )